Where to Go in Argentina – Our Favorite Places and Activities

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When we the Netherlands in 2003, we started a simple blog sharing diary-style stories with tiny photos as the average internet connection was very different from today. Technology developed and so in 2012 or so we decided to build a new website, this one. As a result many of our adventures are not on this website.

As we have a lot more to share on our journey in Argentina, I decided to give an overview here on where you can find stories of ours.

In & Around Buenos Aires

Listening to Stories of the Dead in Recoleta Cemetery in Buenos Aires, Argentina

City of Angels, City of the Dead, or City of Cats: These names all refer to the Recoleta necropolis in Buenos Aires. With 5000 sepulchers this eternal resting place is a rich synthesis of history, art, religion and death, and serves as a tribute to Argentina’s rich and famous. Read more here.

Sightseeing in Buenos Aires – 5 Hidden Corners

Sightseeing in Buenos Aires, let me think for a sec. Okay: taking tango lessons, eating slabs of beef, visiting the Recoleta Cemetery, strolling around Palermo, checking out the football stadium in La Boca… All activities worth undertaking and places worth seeing. So, Coen and I did all that and more on the typical must-see-cum-do list for Buenos Aires. Then part two of the fun started, finding the city’s quiet yet charming spots, hidden churches, local restaurants, and anything else worth exploring outside guidebooks. Read more here.

Flag Day – Carrying Argentina’s Longest Flag

When you don’t plan much on your travels, you can stumble upon big surprises. Argentinians carrying the country’s longest flag through the streets of Rosario was one of them. Frankly, I can’t even remember what brought us to Rosario in the first place. I assume it was just a stop along the way to somewhere else. It isn’t exactly on anyone’s list of highlights. Read more here.

The Andes Mountains & Patagonia

Off the Beaten Tracks around Argentina’s Lake District

I follow a winding trail along the slopes, which demands a bit of clambering over slippery rocks. I pick another handful of those juicy blackberries along the path, which constitute my breakfast. At a stream, I strip and lower myself into one of the shallow pools sheltered by rocks. Water of 100º degrees (40 degrees Celsius) flows down my shoulders, which is bliss in the crisp temperatures of dawn. Read more here.

Hiking in Argentina’s National Park Los Glaciares

We stare at pieces of plastic strewn around our campsite. Chunks of bread lie here and there but we gather 2 of our 3 loaves have disappeared. We’re aghast. A fellow camper walks up to us, “Yeah, we saw a bunch of caracaras coming down and ripping the bags apart to eat the bread,” he says. “Thanks pall, couldn’t you have chased them away? That’s a lot of food we’re missing now,” one of us answers, irritated. Read more here.

5 Killer Camping Spots in Patagonia

In Patagonia, you don’t need a campground; here, rough camping (at campings agrestres, or campings libres) is a way of life. The region is safe, and Argentineans and Chileans are primitive campers themselves — they won’t be surprised to see you pitch your tent in some lonesome spot. These five camping spots are among our favorites. You’ll have to bring your own camping equipment, food, and drinking water, and they can only be reached by private vehicle. Read more here.

Northeast & Central Argentina

Iguazu Falls
Paragliding bij La Cumbre

Strolling Around the Iguazu Falls in Argentina

The 275 waterfalls that make up Iguazu Falls lie on the Argentinean-Brazilian border and I already saw them in Brazil. Yet, I wanted to see this UNESCO World Heritage Site from the Argentinean side as well, even though I wasn’t sure this side would anything to the experience. These falls have one particular feature that Argentina can brag about: They were the stage for the movie The Mission (1986), starring, among other actors, Robert de Niro. Read more here.

Exploring the Jesuit Estancias in Córdoba, Argentina

My introduction to the Jesuit Trail is Estancia Alta Gracia, which lies 35 kilometers southwest of Córdoba and dates from 1643. In the heart of the town, adjacent to a large pond, stand the imposing white stone, baroque church – intriguingly with bells on the rear of the roof instead of the front – and the Jesuits’ former residence. Read more here.

The Atlantic Coast

Valdes
Monte Leon

Whale Watching on Peninsula Valdes in Argentina

“Look at that! Am I seeing what I am seeing? A white baby whale?!”  It was swimming right along its dark-grayish mother in the Golfo Nuevo, a protected bay along the Atlantic Ocean of the Argentinean coast.
“Oh yes, it’s been around for a while. It’s an albino whale. Quite exceptional of course,” my neighbor informed me. I was stunned and fell in love with the place even more than I already had. Read more here.

Other Topics

Eating in Buenos Aires
Difunta Correa

Go Rustic/ Foods of the Argentine Countryside

While one gaucho (cowboy) is moving embers from a fire underneath the parillera, the grill, the cebador serves another round of yerba mate, a herbal tea. Women lay the table, put pitchers of cold water beside Argentinean red wine and bottles of soft drinks. The homemade bread and chimichuri are ready. The gaucho flips the slabs of meat on the parillera and when it’s done, he will cut it with his traditional knife that has a beautifully carved handle, which he always keeps tucked behind his belt. Read more here.

Celebrations & Holidays in Argentina

Argentina has some 150 days per year dedicated to national and public holidays. How many there are varies per month. February with only three commemorative days stands in contrast to October, which has about twenty of them. It takes a while to understand the nuances in Argentina’s maze of holidays, not in the least because Argentinians themselves may not familiar with all of them. Read more here.

Camping in Argentina’s Remote Wilderness Is Unbelievable; These Photos Explain

Argentina has many campgrounds but the beauty is that you don’t need to depend on them. Boondocking is allowed and very common indeed. The most extraordinary camping spots are in the back of beyond, only reachable by car or motorcycle (or the very persistent cyclist).Here are some of Argentina’s mind-blowing places you can’t reach by public transport. Read more here.

For more on Sightseeing & Activities, check out these articles:

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Thank you for your support — Karin-Marijke & Coen

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